Landscape Urbanism (B-KUL-H02Q2A)

3.0 ECTS English 22.5 Second termSecond term Advanced
POC Human Settlements

Introducing the student in the new concept of landscaped urbanism and creating an awareness of its potential as a design strategy in planning urban territories and dealing with the problem of urbanization in general, also in developing countries. In contrast with the course on landscape architecture, which is basically involved with the design of the specific (open air) amenities of contemporary urban life, this course is mainly entering the mode and the method in which landscape can be used as a strategy for creating coherence in today’s urbanization processes.
Landscape urbanism has become an in vogue term of late in North America and Europe. The course will develop the theoretical base of landscape urbanism and highlights the field’s potential resistive power to globalization. It will critically review the hypotheses as put forth by various theorists/practitioners. It will also explore early ancient traditions of landscape urbanism long before it was named as such. Thereafter the course will develop a series of biases embedded within the discourse and realized projects. Although projects that align themselves with landscape urbanism vary substantially in terms of program, site, scale, etc., they share a common interest in overlaying ecological (natural and social) and urban strategies, allowing for projects to address their relationship to their respective cities and regions at multiple scales. One part looks at the recovery of landscape vis-à-vis reclamation and adaptive re-use projects and another documents landscape colonization – landscape urbanism strategies as applied to new urbanity on greenfield sites.
 

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The student needs a basis in landscape architecture, urban design and regional planning / geography in order to understand the basic notions and concepts that are developed in this course

Activities

2.0 ects. Landscape Urbanism: Lecture (B-KUL-H02Q2a)

2.0 ECTSEnglishFormat: Lecture12.0Second termSecond term
POC Human Settlements

Landscape urbanism has become an in vogue term of late in North America and Europe. The course will develop the theoretical base of landscape urbanism and highlights the field’s potential resistive power to globalization. It will critically review the hypotheses as put forth by various theorists/practitioners. It will also explore early ancient traditions of landscape urbanism long before it was named as such. Thereafter the course will develop a series of biases embedded within the discourse and realized projects. Although projects that align themselves with landscape urbanism vary substantially in terms of program, site, scale, etc., they share a common interest in overlaying ecological (natural and social) and urban strategies, allowing for projects to address their relationship to their respective cities and regions at multiple scales. One part looks at the recovery of landscape vis-à-vis reclamation and adaptive re-use projects and another documents landscape colonization – landscape urbanism strategies as applied to new urbanity on greenfield sites.
 The course will consist of nine, 2-hour sessions. Each session will have approximately 1.5 hours of lecture and 30 minutes of discussion. Students are expected to have read the texts for each session and to actively participate in a discussion.

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  • Definition of landscape urbanism as a disciplinary field: investigation and evaluation of the various theories and approaches at hand. Includes the discussion related to the basic uncertainty of planning and the potential answer offered by this new disciplinary approach within that inherent condition of contemporary urbanization.
  • Basic requirements of landscape urbanism proposals: ambitions to give a synthetic overview of the criteria that should be met in order to arrive at a landscape urbanism concept of qualitative improvement. Includes the use of description as a basis for a future strategy of sustainable growth, ecology principles, integration of the physical conditions that structure the landscape and environment at hand, minimal cost development and maintenance, impact over time and strategic phasing based on stages of growth and evolution, etc…
  • Taxonomy of existing concepts, explained by the discussion of relevant recent projects. Includes e.g. themes such as: frame and infill, punctual intervention (acupuncture), forestation and clearing, artificial topography, linkage and profile of infrastructures, etc…

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The teaching method is basically ex cathedra, at least for the more theoretical insights. An intensive use of drawings, sketches and photographs is strongly supported in view of clarifying notions that otherwise might remain too abstract.

1.0 ects. Landscape Urbanism: Presentation (B-KUL-H02Q3a)

1.0 ECTSEnglishFormat: Practical10.5Second termSecond term
POC Human Settlements

Landscape urbanism has become an in vogue term of late in North America and Europe. The course will develop the theoretical base of landscape urbanism and highlights the field’s potential resistive power to globalization. It will critically review the hypotheses as put forth by various theorists/practitioners. It will also explore early ancient traditions of landscape urbanism long before it was named as such. Thereafter the course will develop a series of biases embedded within the discourse and realized projects. Although projects that align themselves with landscape urbanism vary substantially in terms of program, site, scale, etc., they share a common interest in overlaying ecological (natural and social) and urban strategies, allowing for projects to address their relationship to their respective cities and regions at multiple scales. One part looks at the recovery of landscape vis-à-vis reclamation and adaptive re-use projects and another documents landscape colonization – landscape urbanism strategies as applied to new urbanity on greenfield sites.
 The course will consist of nine, 2-hour sessions. Each session will have approximately 1.5 hours of lecture and 30 minutes of discussion. Students are expected to have read the texts for each session and to actively participate in a discussion.

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  • Fields of application: contains an overview and critical discussion of the most indicative examples of recent landscape urbanism, preferably grouped in the major themes and programs for which they are being employed.  

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Evaluation

Evaluation : Landscape Urbanism (B-KUL-H22Q2a)

Type : Exam during the examination period

The exam will consist of a paper and powerpoint presentation to be finalized during the exam period in June. A mid-review of the paper will be made in April [date to be finalized during the course].